Category

Exposure

understand your histogram

Understand your Camera’s Histogram

By | Exposure | 2 Comments

Your Camera’s Histogram is Important

I’m going to talk to you in my language‚Ķthis is not technical at all, BUT it will help you understand your histogram in your camera.

I’m just not a technical person, but I do want you to know that I do have the technical knowledge…. I just don’t like to teach that way unless a student asks me for it.

If you’re looking for technical information, then just leave a comment and I will do my best to make a video for you and others that would like this kind of information.

So let’s get to it…

Our cameras record light coming into the sensor.  There are only three light colors that make all the colors we see in our images.   Red, Green, and Blue make the magic that we see. When we look at our histogram, we can see the amount of that particular color (it will rise up on the graft) and we can see how dark and/or light each of these colors are. The darkest part of your picture will be to the left of the graft and the brightest part will be to the right of the graft. I explain this and more of the fun in the video below.

The histogram is an amazing guide for you to use while you’re shooting.  Look at your histogram and make your adjustments in the camera.   You’ll be much happier when you upload your photographs into the computer.   Here is a small tip… if you’re photographing in RAW format, you’ll be able to push your colors brighter or darker just a bit in post processing.

understand your histogram

Understand your histogram to help with bright colors.

I said in the video that to correct over saturated colors you’ll need to work on a custom white balance. Look out for that video soon ūüėČ

 Do you use the histogram? If you do…how does it help you with your photography?  If you don’t, let me know why and I’ll try to help you understand it more.

 

With the histogram, you can really fine tune your colors and exposure.  I did a deep dive on exposure…you can read about exposure more here.

 

sjp membership

SJP’s Membership email updates.

 

Something really cool is coming this Fall!  Yep, I’m working on my new membership site!

This will be a place to learn and receive new products I have lined up for free!    I’m going to have live calls that you can join in if you’d like and much more for only $29 a month!   To get updates on how it’s going and some freebie treats every other week…sign up here!

I’m so crazy excited that Coco and I are dancing all over the house!  ūüėČ

Have a great day!  Cheers!

 

Janice Sullivan

fix dark backgrounds

Reduce Dark Background From Flash

By | Exposure, Macro & Close-up | 2 Comments

Reducing Your Dark Background From Your Flash

On my first live chat show, one of the critique submissions from William was perfect for a deep dive video. He had a beautiful bug image that was shot with a flash. The background was underexposed because when you get up close with your flash, the light will drop fast so the background will go really dark to black. I told him that I would like to do a deep dive video to show him how I fix flash problems.

There are other ways to help you fix this problem…I know it’s frustrating when you really want to have the background exposed properly. The best way to fix this problem is on the camera while you’re photographing. So let’s get to it…

Adjust your camera settings to Manual Mode. ¬†Do your best to get the best f-stop, shutter-speed and ISO to have the subject and background exposed properly. If you’re shooting bugs or need to stop motion because of wind and other movements happening while you’re photographing, a flash will be needed. ¬†With the manual settings you’ve done previously, do a test shot on ETTL ( Evaluate Through The Lens).¬†This is basically your flash put on manual mode. ¬†Next…put your flash on Manual and play with your ratios.

If this fails, it’s time to be creative.¬†You can bring in a matte picture you’ve shot previously and put it behind your subject or photograph backgrounds that can be added in post production. Look around the subject’s location and see if you like anything and then shoot away. In post you’ll merge them together. I show how to do this in Photoshop during the live show. ¬†Check it out here, it’s about 33 minutes into the show.

I used my Macro Ring Light in the behind-the-scenes. I really like the soft feel I get with this flash. But like I always say…light is light. You don’t need this lens to make a great Macro shot. You just need to understand your equipment and it’s limitations.

fix dark backgrounds

How to fix dark backgrounds from your flash

 

How do you work your flash situation when you have these problems? I’d love to know ūüôā

 

Cheers to beautiful backgrounds!

Janice Sullivan

How to Use Social Media for Photographers

How to Use Social Media for Photographers

By | Business, Exposure | No Comments

How to Use Social Media for Photographers

One of my photographer friends was a bit frustrated with Facebook and how fine art photographers just don’t get the likes and shares as much as a person who photographs people and sunsets. ¬† It’s true, I know it can be frustrating. ¬†You work so hard on an image and you just don’t feel it’s given the justice it deserves.

I want to talk to you today about where you should hang out on Social Media and how to use it as a photographer.

Two Reasons you SHOULD use Social Media

 

To get the most out of social media as a photographer, you should use it for two reasons:

1. To connect with other artists to inspire you and get the creative juices flowing.

2.  To connect with potential buyers and market your work.

Did you notice I said, “To connect” in both reasons? ¬† ¬†It IS a social¬†platform. ¬†It’s important for you to connect with the people who you enjoy and because time is so precious, focus on one place and dominate it.

Yes, you’ll see the big photographers on many other social places at one time, but most of them have help publishing their work out to these sites. ¬† Social Media can be a rabbit hole and the deeper you get into it the more you’ll be lost in that hole. ¬†So stay focused and go for it all the way.

Some help to get you started. 

For business, do a search on Google to give you ideas on where your clients may be.  Here are some to look for:

Interior Designers

Art Buyers/Directors

Photo Agents

Magazine Photography Editors

Gallery Curators

If you would like to search more for people who need your work, check out  https://www.behance.net/  They have a job tab and you can search to see who is looking for your work. It will help you see who would like to connect with you socially.

Of course, if any of you have more suggestions let us know in the comment section.

 

Where to hang out?

You’re saying ok…now that I’ve done my research where should I hang out? ¬†Great question! ¬†From all of the years I’ve been out there here is what I’ve seen…

These social media sites cater to certain media, but that doesn’t mean it won’t be good for you. ¬†The key is to really use one and use it full force.

Yes, LinkedIn was good for me, but it may not be for you.  If you join LinkedIn, join groups and be active.

Facebook – ¬†What’s popular are people shots and beautiful landscapes. ¬†You can get to your target market for business, but sorry to say you will need to pay to connect with them.

Google+ – Landscapes are huge on Google+, but there are a variety of groups to connect with for inspiration. ¬†Unless you’re selling to photographers, it’s difficult to use this social site for business. ¬†But with that said,¬†being active here is one of the best ways to be found in a Google search…. just make sure you use important hashtags.

Twitter – ¬†It’s a fast social site and you really have to stay on it, but you can connect with photographers and your buyers. Use your images on tweets and push everyone to your website if you’re in it for business.

Instagram – A great place to find inspiration. ¬†Hashtags are important! ¬†Check out this site for your profile link: https://linktr.ee/¬† It’s perfect for the business side of your Instagram.

Pinterest – Another great place for inspiration. ¬†If you use for business, you’ll need to post a lot to be seen.

500px – This is a ranking site and there are many out there. If you don’t connect here you won’t go anywhere. ¬†Landscapes are huge on 500. ¬†I wouldn’t use this for business because I’m not a huge landscape photographer and if you send your clients there they will see the top images…your competition. ¬†No way in hell would I ever point to a site like this for potential clients, just saying.

ello – Inspiration Social Site for Artist

Deep Dive Question

Your question for the day…. What social media platform are you using and is it working for you? ¬†If it’s not working…let us know where you are and what you shoot so we can help you focus.

If you take time to really connect with people for inspiration and/or business, just remember it will pay off when you focus on one site and dominate it!

Sign up for my email to get your challenges every other week. ¬†I bet you can guess what this week’s challenge will be. ¬†ūüėȬ† I also add a bit more goodies for our readers…hope to see you there.

My tweet for the day ūüôā

Tweet: How you succeed in being noticed is to be social on social media. https://ctt.ec/vd1O6+

Cheers,

Janice Sullivan

Understand Exposure to be a power shooter.

Stop Being a Snap Shooter and Really Focus on Exposure

By | Exposure, Tips & Lessons | No Comments

I know that exposure isn’t the sexiest thing to talk about…we just want to make awesome pictures and really hope that we grabbed the perfect shot the first time. But unfortunately that rarely¬†happens ūüôĀ ¬† So I’m here today to discuss this dreaded word: EXPOSURE.¬†If you LOVE exposure, kudos to you and I’m slapping a high five at you right now! If not, let’s help you understand what happens with your camera when it makes the exposure and how you can work it!

Let’s dive in a bit deeper than the¬†3 parts that make an exposure that I talked about a couple of weeks ago.

Once you really understand exposure, you’ll have so much power while using your camera, and if you’re a power freak like me, you’ll be in photography heaven while you photograph.¬†No Snap Shooting for YOU!

 

 

I talked about the steps to start your learning fun with exposure. For now just play and don’t stress out. You’ll get it!

Here is another visual to help you see the difference of how bright the sky is compared to the grass and trees in the field. I manual shot the best image paying attention to what I could bring out when I processed this in ON1.

The grass looks great, but I couldn’t get the clouds to pop.

 

 Focus on Exposure

1/125 @ f6.7 ISO 200 Manual Mode Over Exposed

 

Now the sky looks amazing, but everything else looks like crap!

 

 Focus on Exposure

1,3000 @ f6.7 ISO 200 Manual Mode

 

So this was the shot I had to work with. I had just enough information to pull out what I wanted to make my river of grass shot. ūüôā

 

Exposure to get the shot. Had to use manual mode.

1/350 @ f6.7 ISO 200 Manual Mode

 

It was tough, but I worked the image and got what I wanted in one shot! Whew! Fun…fun!

 

Stop being the Snap Shooter and really Focus on Exposure

Correct Exposure to get the shot.

 

This is another way to get up close and personal with your camera, so when you start to photograph and just look at your scene, you’ll¬†start to know what’s going to happen before you even push that shutter button. I’d like you to be different than the snap shooters, and the way you really begin to create your OWN work is to understand that there may be problems with your exposure and to know what to do when those problems arise.

Normally I ask you questions, but I thought today it would be better for YOU to ask me questions.¬†If you want more techie answers, I’ll answer them here in the comment section. ¬†Feel free to ask anything¬†about exposure, I really do want to help if you’re just not understanding why the pictures are not turning out the way you want them to!

 

Cheers,

Janice

 

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